Welcome to the Lorenzo Ruiz Mission Society

© Lorenzo Ruiz Mission Society 2018

Welcome to the Lorenzo Ruiz Mission Society

Msgr. Noly A. Que, LRMS

Rector

Est. 1987

The Lorenzo Mission Institute is the home of priestly and missionary formation of the Lorenzo Ruiz Mission Society. It took its name from the first Filipino-Chinese Martyr saint Lorenzo Ruiz who was canonized by John Paul II in 1987 on the year also when the seminary began. The pastoral care of the Church toward cultures and subcultures had been as old as Christianity itself. However, the relationship between the Christian faith and cultures had been the constant path of the Church from the beginning of its existence and is manifested in different forms and had been shaped by various cultural changes and needs. The beginnings of the Filipino-Chinese Apostolate can be traced back to the episcopacy of Domingo de Salazar, OP who was the first bishop of Manila in 1587. For almost 500 years, the apostolate has been a relevant, a fascinating, and ever growing pastoral concern. Paul VI and John Paul II were great hallmarks of inspiration to the local church in the Philippines. Their pastoral visits in 1970 and 1981 respectively, were undying inspirations to us for mission. They reminded us of the challenge to share Christ and the faith to the countries of Asia and the world. Realizing more the ecclesiology of the Second Vatican Council which emphasizes on a more participative and missionary Church, the Philippines intensifies its missionary character to the world as it strongly adheres to missio ad gentes particularly in Asia today. Thus, stated in the document of the Second Plenary Council “and here in our own land is a vast field of mission related to the Filipino-Chinese apostolate. Less than 20% of the Chinese in the Philippines have had some effective evangelization. The progress made in evangelizing through the educational and pastoral work of the Filipino-Chinese apostolate is a great encouragement. We need to intensify this. But we must look beyond our shores and take note of the missionary opportunities opened by the contacts that our Filipino-Chinese brothers and sisters have with East Asian Chinese communities, including the People’s Republic of China whose openness to religion remains fluid. We need to provide encouragement, support, and personnel to this important mission.” (PCP II, no. 109)



Lorenzo Mission Institute